Having a covered structure at your range facility in 2019 must feel like a winning lottery ticket.

Historically bad weather for North America — colder than normal temperatures; unprecedented amounts of rainfall; high wind warnings — held many parts of the continent in a vice-grip this spring refusing to let go.

Regions of the United States and Canada experienced weather so abysmal that records on multiple fronts were shattered, some dating back 124 years to 1895 when weather statistics first started to be documented.

Cancelled lessons, postponed equipment fittings and rescheduling of demo days forced operators into full blown damage control seeking ways to minimize mounting revenue losses.

Now that summer is here and spring 2019 — if you can call it that – is thankfully done indications of a drier summer with “high to very high ultraviolet (UV) values requiring shade and cover precautions especially between the hours of 11 a.m. — 4 p.m.” have put range owners and teaching pros on high alert.

Skin cancer is on the rise. A recent article in Golf Digest magazine by writer David Owen, himself a victim, indicates cases of non-melanoma skin cancer have increased a whopping 77 percent from 1994 to 2014 and that melanoma cases will rise 7.7 percent in 2019. This according to data furnished by the Skin Cancer Foundation in the United States.

One ominous statistic in the Owen article indicates melanoma – not breast cancer – is the leading cause of cancer death among women 25-30. It is a disease with no age or gender bias.

All of this builds an increasingly stronger case for covered range structures. It’s why the golf industry has made these types of products a higher priority than ever before and the reason worldwide sales are on the rise.

A range cover can shield out 95 percent of harmful UV rays and is fully capable of waterproofing any environment in a downpour. That is a huge business advantage. It’s also a smart investment. Not only can the ‘climate control’ aspects of a range cover protect customers and staff with every use it can also protect operational bottom line by maximizing range potential year round.

In a season of abnormally foul weather — like 2019 — that’s impossible to put a price on.